Ride The East Wind

Meet Private Payne...

Overlooking Nakagusuku Bay, Okinawa, Japan, in the beautiful Ryukyu Islands lies Rose Hill Plantation, home of 87 year old Private Payne, the founder of businesses in Hawaii, Alaska and East Asia, whose philosophy has always been, "Win some, lose some; be sure to win more than you lose." Private Payne had and has many business ventures- a rollercoaster of enterprises in his East Asia career, learning early, "Don't make enemies- life is cheap in East Asia." He will have you riding shotgun with him through the dangers of business intrigue, graft and corruption. At the present time, Private Payne and his three sons own a chain of eleven restaurants and other businesses in Okinawa, Japan. He can be found at Rose Hill Plantation researching the many facets of his long love affair with the beauty, splendor and intrigue of East Asia as he completes the sequel, "THE WILD WILD EAST"

Japanese Collage
Book 1 - Kings Creek
Book 2 - Better to Never Have Met You in My Dream
Book 3 - Ride the East Wind
Book 4 - The Wild Wild East
Book 5 - Revenge of the Fire Dragon
Book 6 - The Conspirators
Book 7 - Blows The West Wind
Mountain Potato Junior High

Contact Us

Private Payne
privatepayne@glbb.jp
callme@eml.cc
www.ridetheeastwind.com
www.privatepayne.com
Phone Japan: 090 3793 5555
International: 81 90 3793 5555

Excerpts from Blows the West Wind

The Battle for Okinawa

Better never to have met you in my dream, than to wake and reach for hands that are not there

Otomo no Yakamochi

The bloodiest battle of the Pacific war took place on the Island of Okinawa. American casualties are estimated to have been 82,000 with over 12,000 killed in action. . . and It is estimated, 100,000 Japanese soldiers with supporting elements were killed in battle or committed suicide. The civilian population suffered untold horrors. Out of a population of 300,000 Okinawans, it is estimated that 100,000, one third of the population, were killed. To add even further atrocities, many Okinawans were forced to kill their families and then to commit suicide by the Japanese soldiers. It was a bitter life and death struggle with a determined foe who were dug into the hillsides and the swaths of jungle patches across the islands lush vegetation.

It is Mariko's eighteenth birthday, April 1st, 1945 - a day she will long remember.
The noisy shelling and bombing that seemed unending- suddenly ceased. Now there is only an eerie silence . . . as if the very air itself-stood still. Private Jimmy Luc holds his M I rifle tightly in his hands as he peers out over the railing of the Higgins landing craft. The water is calm; it is a pleasant sunny morning,and Jimmy relaxes his mind as the boat moves forward. The beach ahead . . looks seemingly peaceful.